One Person's "Crazy," Another's "Passion" - Who's to Say Which is Which

Several months ago a Scientology promotional "interview" of Tom Cruise, meant for "the faithful," was posted on YouTube. And thus began the latest round of "Tom Cruise is crazy" media buzz. So, remembering my journalism training, I had to watch the video to figure out what all the noise was about...[youtube=]

Well, he's definitely passionate about what he believes in. But what seems to offend the folks was his unspoken belief that it's the responsibility of high-level Scientologists to save us from ourselves and that only Scientologists can do this. Interesting. But then anyone with a deep commitment to their religion is going to feel that way, whether they say it or not. In fact, not long after watching the video I heard Greg Laurie, Calvary Chapel pastor and evangelist, say on the radio that only those who know Jesus as their savior know true joy in their lives, and beyond that he seemed to be saying that only Born-Again Christians really know the meaning of happiness and joy and emotions. If it weren't for the fact that I was rushing to work I might have stopped the car right then. I mean, how does someone say to someone else, who hasn't had that experience, that all of their emotional experiences are not valid or true?

Coming from Tom Cruise that would have been considered another example of his nuttiness, so why is it okay for Greg Laurie to say?

I'm sure that Laurie doesn't mean to invalidate the worth, meaningfulness or truths in the lives of the billions and billions who have lived and died without the kind of conversion experience he's sharing. But in pressing home his beliefs, he seems to be saying that whatever you have known or have experienced or felt, it is all bullshit apart from having a personal relationship with Jesus. Wow. So that becomes the only reality. How is this different from the criticized rantings from a Hollywood actor? JBB Craig Ferguson version of the Cruise "interview":

Music: Tom Cruise Crazy from the album "Thing a Week Three" by Jonathan Coulton